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$1M fund established for MS research


Vancouver, BCThe Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada and The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD) have formed a partnership to accelerate the pace of Canadian research in multiple sclerosis. The MS Society says it is establishing a $1 million fund with CDRD to help transform promising research discoveries in MS into therapies.

“Over many decades, we have funded MS research that has led to significant insights about how the disease works and novel therapies for people living with MS,” said Karen Lee, vice-president, research, MS Society of Canada. “Through our collaboration with CDRD, we will accelerate the translation of these insights to expedite the development of effective treatments that have the capacity to make a meaningful impact on the lives of people living with MS today.” 

To address this, the MS Society is working with CDRD to identify the most promising scientific discoveries to date, and develop them into treatments and a cure for MS. CDRD, Canada’s first and only centre of its kind, has access to technologies and projects from researchers and institutions across the globe, which ensures they are in an optimal position to develop life-changing treatments.

In addition, CDRD attracts and motivates industrial partners to invest in and help accelerate drug development. CDRD operates a high-level, fully integrated facility that collaborates with over 40 international organizations and a network of more than 10,000 investigators who are all involved in translational research initiatives.  

CDRD President and CEO, Karimah Es Sabar commented, “The critical value of all stakeholders coming together – from the investigators conducting the breakthrough research, to foundations, translational centres, industry, government, and of course patients themselves – cannot be overstated. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada is an outstanding organization representing the patients, and CDRD is excited about our partnership and the impact it will have.”

“Focus on translational research is critical to ensuring that basic knowledge generated in the lab can find its way into the clinic,” said V. Wee Yong, MS researcher and professor at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Oncology, University of Calgary. “It helps researchers like me build the right partnerships to move the right discoveries through the treatment development process.”