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$5.5M supports global indigenous health research projects


Ottawa, ON – Three global indigenous health research projects, that look at HIV/AIDS, mental health and indigenous health workforce networks, have received $5.5 million in funding support from the federal government.

The projects announced today are supported by the International Collaborative Indigenous Health Research Partnership (ICIHRP), an initiative resulting from a Tripartite Cooperation Agreement between New Zealand (HRC NZ), Australia (NHMRC) and Canada (CIHR) signed in 2002. The total contribution of the three countries, over 5 years, amounts to approximately $12.3 million.

One research project was jointly supported by Australia, New Zealand and Canada:

– Prof John Kaldor, from the University of South Wales (Australia), in collaboration with Dr Neil Andersson from the Community Information and Epidemiological Technologies Group Canada, affiliated with the University of Ottawa, and Dr Clive Aspin from the University of Auckland (New Zealand), will explore how indigenous people are able to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS. This project is also supported by the CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity. Total three-country support amounts to approximately $5.8 million.

Two additional research projects were jointly supported by New Zealand and Canada:

– Dr Laurence Kirmayer, from the Sir Mortimer B Davis-Jewish General Hospital affiliated with McGill University, along with Dr Pamela Bennett, from the University of Auckland (New Zealand), will look at the factors that promote resilience in mental health in Indigenous People across their lifespan. Total contribution from New Zealand and Canada amounts to approximately $3.2 million; and,

– Dr Judith Bartlett, from the University of Manitoba, with Dr Paul Robertson, from the University of Otago (News Zealand), will develop an outline of the optimum intersect between the Indigenous health workforce and its networks during key work-life transitions. The project is also supported by the CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research. Total contribution from New Zealand and Canada amounts to approximately $3.3 million.

The funding is provided through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

“These innovative collaborative projects announced today will contribute new advanced global health knowledge that aims to reduce disparity in health and well-being for Indigenous Peoples’ communities in these three countries,” says Dr Jeff Reading, scientific director of CIHR’s IAPH.